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scott36305

Dark Grey with Silver colored specs. Any ideas?

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Hello All. Found this 'rock' on the side of the road among the rest of the gravel. It is magnetic. Long story short, I cracked it open to see the inside. It has tiny silver colored specs that are actually tiny spherules. I polished the one side with ceramic and it barely leaves any color for the streak test. The polished side shows a dull grey and the spots are a shiny silver.

So, my question is do I invest in a scale or is this a normal rock that someone has seen piles of?

Any opinions would great. Hopefully the pics turn out ok.

Thx

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post-26360-0-60296800-1345005861_thumb.j

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there is a good chance that is a chondrite of some sort...your pic's are not sharply focused...

along the road, among the gravel...good eye!

What state? And why were you loooking in that spot?

fred

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I am fairly certain this is not a meteorite based on the pictures...however I know Jack Schitt. Your tests and window into the rock are productive. My suggestion is test for Ni as your next step.

Jim

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Based on the pix, I'd say better than 50/50 you have one there ... Cheers, Unc

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I'm with Jim, it doesn't look like a meteorite to me; the exterior is all wrong, and despite the metal the interior is all wrong, too. Maybe a piece of slag of some sort, especially considering you found it in roadbed gravel.

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I am leaning more on the no side. I can see the shiny metal on the unpolished rough side of the rock.

Dave.

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I am leaning more on the no side. I can see the shiny metal on the unpolished rough side of the rock.

Dave.

X-2....... BUT were it me I would show someone face to face as pictures are not the best way to get an answer. I learned the hard way to ALWAYS properly ID any sample before giving up!

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Thanks for all the comments guys. I'm in Southeast Alabama, 30 minutes from Georgia or Florida. Its a funny story how I found that rock. Started about a year ago when I was leaving our new building after work one day and I noticed a very dark colored rock at the edge of the gravel in the lot behind the building. I was absolutely positive that it was a meteorite. I checked it with a magnet, It had all the markings. Melt and flow lines, Fusion Crust and Thumbprinting. I filed one lump of it and found solid metal. I was sure it was a meteorite and it was the coolest thing ever for about 4 or 5 days. It was then that I started looking down more often.

Fast forward to about 2 weeks ago.

I'm looking around in my backyard and i find a couple small dark rocks similar to the larger rock I had found previously. I tested them with a magnet and they were also strongly reactive. Then it started. The more I looked, it became easier and easier to locate this material. Small shiny melted looking rock in colors ranging from light tan to dark brown, almost black. The darker they were, the more likely they would react to the magnet but it wasnt always the case. I was finding handfulls of this stuff and was baffled by it. After some searching on the interwebs I was starting to consider the possibility of being in the ejecta field(sp?Term?) of the Wetumpka, Alabama Meteorite so I pulled it up on Google and checked the distance. After some highly technical zooming in and out on google earth I quickly determined that Wetumpka is way too far away for me to have debris in my backyard. As I'm zooming out I notice a large half circular shape on the map around Birmingham and after more interweb searching I find a few mentions that Lake Guntersville is thought to be ground zero for a large impact. Nothing in article form, just frustrating mentions. A couple of days later I'm over at a friends house and we're standing out in his driveway which is mostly gravel and grass with some patches of red clay/sand and I find another couple of dark, heavy, magnetic rocks. Extremely curious about this I decide to make some spot checks around the area to see if I could find more rocks all over the place. I envisioned having to do a statewide survey before having to look into Mississippi and Georgia. It was gonna be HUGE, lol. I was able to find more of these rocks and at one spot about 1/4 mile down the road from my house, on the side of the road I picked up the new rock-in-question. It looked way different that the rest I'd been finding because it didnt seem to have any rust. I kept it because it was heavy and possibly crusted but put it to the side with all the rest of the rocks and pebbles i'd been picking up. Inevitably, after many hours of reading and searching I was faced with the cold reality that I live in a bed of Hematite/ Magnatite. I found pictures that looked just like these rocks and everything said so. Then I found out about the streak test and that sealed the deal. What a maroon. Interwebs had me there for a minute. I'd even learned enough to know that indeed, my first prized find was also bogus. Very likely a piece of slag leftover from something, somewhere.... Now the only thing that's left is to start cracking these things open to check out the insides so I start picking them out one by one. I cracked open all the bigger ones (large grape size) and worked down looking at all the insides one by one. Lots of quartz looking crystals which I now know is another meteorite no-no. I'm completely dejected as I'm gingerly cracking my rocks in half and when I get to the Grey rock I don't even think about it as I hit it the first time. 2nd time. 3rd and 4th. It finally cracks open and as I'm inspecting my bounty under the glass I realise that I was hasty in my decision to crack this one open. I could see the tiny sphereules on the freshly broken surface and that prompted me to start polishing. As I polished and polished, the sting of a fizzled discovery began to fade and I'm left with, at the very least, the coolest rock I've ever found.

That's the story. Sorry it went kinda long, I tend to do that.

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Scott,

Nickle in a meteorite is fairly pliable. Minerals that shine like metal are not. Take a sewing pin and pick at one of these shinny spots and see if you can get one to fold. If it's just a shinny mineral, it will break apart. Nickle will tend to stay together. Also, looking at them in a loupe can often tell you it it is solid metal or a mineral as you can see the crystal shape appear under good magnification.

I do not like saying yes or no over some pictures simply because one of the answers could be right or wrong. If you polish this better, the matrix may reveal more clues as well...chondrules.

Jim

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The shiney metal can be seen on meteorites where the exterior ablated and then polished by the matrix it is laying in...chondrites are not always plentful or easily visible, even when the piece is polished...

you should have some one look at it...I think there are some meteorite people in Alabama, do a search...

fred

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