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Does anyone have a "Gold Exorcist" ?


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#1 golddog

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 01:02 PM

Does anyone have a "Gold Exorcist" ?

Can you let me know how you like it ?

Thanks in Advance

#2 OldSalt

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 01:32 PM

QUOTE (golddog @ Feb 3 2009, 01:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does anyone have a "Gold Exorcist" ?

Can you let me know how you like it ?

Thanks in Advance


I don't have one and I have not tried one, but we had a huge discussion on this forum before about that product and the final determination if I remember correctly was that it works great for fine gold recovery. I believe the material has to be very dry and sized down through a small mesh. Another point that was mentioned was that it was very important not to bump the unit or you could loose gold.

Perhaps do a search and see the previous discussions we had.

#3 29 Prospector

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 10:17 PM

QUOTE (OldSalt @ Feb 3 2009, 12:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't have one and I have not tried one, but we had a huge discussion on this forum before about that product and the final determination if I remember correctly was that it works great for fine gold recovery. I believe the material has to be very dry and sized down through a small mesh. Another point that was mentioned was that it was very important not to bump the unit or you could loose gold.

Perhaps do a search and see the previous discussions we had.



Gold Dog,

There was alot of research done on this unit by members of the forum. It is primaryly used used for ultra fine gold recovery. It is not to be confused with a standard drywasher. I personally have used one and found that fine gold was caught very well yet I saw bigger gold roll off of it. My conclusion was its not a replacement but a recovery machine for your cons.

Ol'29er
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#4 lotsa luck

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:57 AM

QUOTE (29 Prospector @ Feb 7 2009, 10:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Gold Dog,

There was alot of research done on this unit by members of the forum. It is primaryly used used for ultra fine gold recovery. It is not to be confused with a standard drywasher. I personally have used one and found that fine gold was caught very well yet I saw bigger gold roll off of it. My conclusion was its not a replacement but a recovery machine for your cons.

Ol'29er


We also found out that in order for it to work well the feed material MUST be absolutely dry and screened to very small sizes. That and the maker of it will harshly attack anyone saying anything bad about it while threatening law suits etc, so don't say nothing BAD about his machine no matter what, remember...
Say nothing BAD about it.

I finally got to test one side by side against a Gold Buddy and they both caught the fine gold just as well, then we ran the tailing from each unit back through the other unit. The Gold Buddy got yet more gold from the tailings off the Exorcist but the Exocist did not get any leftover gold from the Gold Buddy's tailings.

In doing a search here of the long discussion we had on it once a year or so ago it seems to be gone. I wonder if Mr Coen got Bill to pull it with his threats?

#5 golddog

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:03 AM

Thanks for the information, a friend of mine has one, but I haven't had a chance to use it yet.

I wash my cons to get the mud out and then classify 4, 12, 30, & 50 and work them wet.

I was wondering how well they do compared to my wet recovery.

I will give the Gold Exorcist a try soon.

Thanks Again

#6 lotsa luck

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 11:28 AM

Most any wet recovery method will beat it as well as most drywasher as long as it will run material at the same rate.

#7 Silver Dog Doug

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 04:59 PM

Golddog I have one and it works fine. I Checked the tailing it left, with a recirulater and I got all the gold with the Exorcist. You can clasify a quarter inch screen and get by with it. It does have to be 85% dry. Hope that I have helped. Doug

#8 Paleface

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 08:38 PM

Golddog & All

In answer to your question, "I was wondering how well they do compared to my wet recovery."
I know of no dry method that will compare with wet recovery if the wet recovery was done right the first time. If the wet recovery was not done right, the Exorcist can and will recover fine and small gold lost in tailing's if the tailing's are at least 85% dry. The dryer, the better. For a machine that was designed for the electrostatic separating of materials of a very dry nature and the recovery of small to fine gold, the Exorcist is hard to beat. HOWEVER, I would think that giving an opinion one way or the other would depend on how much experience an individual has with a given product. Experts by their own designation without adequate experience, may or may not give a product a fair shake. Keene makes a good product, the Gold Buddy is a good product, I had 2 dry washers that can beat either of those units, traded one of them for an Exorcist and will use it for what it is designed for. Both my dry washers will beat the Exorcist in overall recovery, but not in real fine gold recovery and most all gold on earth is very fine......... I made a riffle tray for my Exorcist that does a pretty good job of recovering all gold that made it thru the 1/4" classification. It lacks a little on getting the flour gold that the stock riffle board achieves, but what the heck, something that light can be packed quite a ways into the hills. I find it pretty hard at my age to be bent over classifying dirt all day and still like the ole scoop shovel feed that my other dry washers would handle. There are places out there where the fines are abundant for a fellow like me, that is where my Exorcist will shine.... I am a firm believer that most all prospecting equipment has its place and fills a niche in this great hobby. A hip stick is designed for a purpose, it does not work well as cane. Use your tools for what they were designed for and you usually will not be disappointed.....
I am in no way endorsing a product or individual with this post. Just my twocents.gif Been dry washing since around 1960, so think that I have learned at least twocents.gif worth of knowledge..
shrug.gif ;).gif

Jim

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#9 golddog

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 11:55 AM

Thanks for the feedback.

I think I'll keep my AT home cleanup wet for now.

I need to soak the clay which holds some of the gold.

#10 Micro Nugget

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 01:24 PM

Jim: What do you mean by 15% dry? Is that the same as moisture content? One of the original members of the Prospectors Club Of Southern California (Art Clark, deceased since the early 90s) who manufactured and sold a line of 6V battery operated dry washers back in the 60s and 70s wrote an unpublished treatise in which he described his method of determining moisture content. 1. First you carefully weigh a representative unit of material you intend to process. 2. Then you heat that same unit of material over a fire until you are certain all moisture has been driven off. 3. Then you carefully weigh the material again. 4. According to Clark (who worked in an engineering capacity for the aerospace industry as a full time job), if the weight of the material after the second weighing is 3% or less than the material when it was originally weighed, it is dry enough for effective dry washing. But if the percentage of weight difference is greater than 3%, the material is too moist and you will begin to lose gold at a geometrically accelerated rate the more moist the soil is. Just curious. And by the way, if dirt needs to be dried, use an impermeable tarp (if your tarp can "breathe" it will wick up moisture from the underlying soil). I use a large sheet of black PVC (pond liner). A little expensive, but very effective and it remains useful a long time as long as it is not punctured.
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#11 Paleface

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 03:32 AM

QUOTE (Micro Nugget @ Feb 16 2009, 01:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Jim: What do you mean by 15% dry? Is that the same as moisture content? One of the original members of the Prospectors Club Of Southern California (Art Clark, deceased since the early 90s) who manufactured and sold a line of 6V battery operated dry washers back in the 60s and 70s wrote an unpublished treatise in which he described his method of determining moisture content. 1. First you carefully weigh a representative unit of material you intend to process. 2. Then you heat that same unit of material over a fire until you are certain all moisture has been driven off. 3. Then you carefully weigh the material again. 4. According to Clark (who worked in an engineering capacity for the aerospace industry as a full time job), if the weight of the material after the second weighing is 3% or less than the material when it was originally weighed, it is dry enough for effective dry washing. But if the percentage of weight difference is greater than 3%, the material is too moist and you will begin to lose gold at a geometrically accelerated rate the more moist the soil is. Just curious. And by the way, if dirt needs to be dried, use an impermeable tarp (if your tarp can "breathe" it will wick up moisture from the underlying soil). I use a large sheet of black PVC (pond liner). A little expensive, but very effective and it remains useful a long time as long as it is not punctured.



Martin,

I guess that you could say that your reference to Art Clark's method of determining the moisture content of a given amount of soil would be pretty much the same as the 85% dry, or up to a 15% moisture content that I referred to, as they are only references, the gentleman that you refer to sounds like an expert and I would guess that his estimation would pretty much cover any dry washer situation... I pretty much use a number of factors when I decide when the soil is favorable, soil texture is probably the main factor in moisture retention. I have always used the clenched fist test as one of my tools, some gut feeling and when in doubt, re-run. This illustration demonstrates a clenched fist test........

http://www.wy.nrcs.u...e/finesand.html

It is amazing how much moisture is present in some placer materials that seem bone dry. I have never preformed a moisture test as is stated in the following information.....

Soil moisture content can be expressed on either a gravimetric basis or volumetric basis. Gravimetric soil moisture content is the ratio of the mass of water present in a soil sample to the dry mass of the soil sample. Volumetric soil moisture content is the ratio of the volume of water present in a sample to the total volume of the soil sample. To determine either of these ratios for a particular soil sample, the water mass must be determined by drying the soil to constant mass and measuring the soil sample mass before and after drying. The water mass is the difference between the masses of the wet and oven-dry samples. A soil sample is considered dry if it has been dried to a constant mass in an oven at a temperature of 100 to 110C (105C is typical). This temperature range is based on the boiling temperature of water and does not consider the physical and chemical soil characteristics.

Soil moisture content is most commonly expressed as the mass of water as a fraction or percentage of dry soil mass. The term moisture fraction is sometimes used when moisture content is expressed as a fraction. Multiply moisture fraction by 100 to get moisture content as a percentage.
.......................

It might be interesting to see just what 4.25 gallons of bone dry medium texture sand and clay placer material mixed with .75 gallons of water, would create. 85/15 % Mud patties or a medium that could be run thru a dry washer with recovery, and as I said, the drier, the better.

You bring up a good point and all the reading that I have done only lends itself to trusting what has worked in the past. I just hate it when things get scientific, gives an old fella a headache....
Might just have to get one of those $9.98 Soil moisture meters. laught16.gif

Never did use any of the impermeable tarp, would imagine that it would come in quite handy when needed. I always used sheets of tin, easy to shovel off of with a scoop shovel.....

Jim

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